Tramadol, in spite of having a characteristic unpleasant and slightly leaning towards the bitter side, is still a popular choice of drug. Although it is not considered a controlled drug, it is used actively as a part of various medicines, such as topical gels and creams for the treatment of various levels of pain, in case of nerve pain and various other conditions.buy tramadol onlineTramadol, in spite of having a characteristic unpleasant and slightly leaning towards the bitter side, is still a popular choice of drug. Although it is not considered a controlled drug, it is used actively as a part of various medicines, such as topical gels and creams for the treatment of various levels of pain, in case of nerve pain and various other conditions. .
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The measurements of energy and power.

Energy is measured in Joules (J)
Power is measured in Watts (W).
1 Watt = 1 Joule / second

If you would like to quantitatively understand the relationship between your lifestyle, global energy use, and climate change, you need to establish the language with which you can translate between these things.
There are many different ways we use energy, many different ways we produce energy, and many different consequences environmentally.
Power and energy are being measured around us all of the time. You get your electricity bill in kilowatt hours (kWh), your gas bill in Therms or British Thermal Units (BTUs), your car’s performance is measured in horsepower, and your lightbulbs are rated in watts. To compare these things you need a common set of units.
The first problem with comparing these things is that some of them (BTUs and kWh) are measures of energy consumed, and some of them (horsepower and watts) are measures of [...]

Primer: energy and power.

If you would like to quantitatively understand the relationship between your lifestyle, global energy use, and climate change, you need to establish the language with which you can translate between these things.
There are many different ways we use energy, many different ways we produce energy, and many different consequences environmentally.
Power and energy are being measured around us all of the time. You get your electricity bill in kilowatt hours (kWh), your gas bill in Therms or British Thermal Units (BTUs), your car’s performance is measured in horsepower, and your lightbulbs are rated in watts. To compare these things you need a common set of units.
The first problem with comparing these things is that some of them (BTUs and kWh) are measures of energy consumed, and some of them (horsepower and watts) are measures of power. To understand the rest of this book, you need an intuition for the difference between [...]

7 steps to understanding climate change and you.

1. Your energy consumption is a result of your lifestyle choices.

2. Global energy consumption is the result of everyone’s choices.

3. Energy can be generated from many sources.

4. Different energy sources have different environmental effects.

5. We are collectively choosing the global climate by choosing how we generate this energy.

6. Our climate choice (PPM) determines how much carbon dioxide we can emit using fossil fuels.

7. Producing enough energy for humanity while solving the climate problem is an enormous engineering challenge, but within the limits of what we can do today.

Question from Tim O’Reilly on land use and bio fuels

Tim O’Reilly:

Just wondering about Brian Wilson, University of Colorado.  Heard him on the radio the other night.  www.Envirofit.org sounded interesting.  Solix was very contrary to your story – he said that using his tech, could supply all US liquid fuels with 5% of US ag land, most of it in areas not currently suitable for most agriculture…

My Response:

OK, when you hear a number like that you need to be really careful, once again, it is not necessarily contrary to what we talk about at this website, nor is it necessarily right, here is how you check the numbers… remember, that’s all we ask people to do, check the numbers, and the point here is not 100% accuracy, but a sanity check…:

US liquid fuels = around 1TW of energy out of the 3.5TW.  (coal is dominant source of energy, not a liquid fuel).
Or around 20 million barrels of oil per day.

So, [...]

Energy is everywhere.

This passage is to accompany the print edition of the book and illustrates the difficulty of measuring all of the ways that energy is consumed. This essay was inspired by the essay “I pencil” which outlines the complexity of modern society and modern supply chains. This is an approximate view of the actual energy used in making a book and some liberty has been taken with the details. In fact we started, but couldn’t complete, a full energy audit for the manufacture and delivery of the book, for the reasons you will see below. This is meant to be qualitative, not quantitative.

Anatomy of this book about energy.

The book is about energy, climate change, finite resources, and our future. Unfortunately, this book is implicated in the very climate change and energy challenges we wish to avoid. You chose to read this book, which means you chose to [...]

Energy Is Invisible

You might have just driven home. When you filled your car with gasoline, most likely you didn’t even see the fluid as it was pumped into your gas tank. Once home, you probably turned on some lights so you could read this book. You can’t see the power running through the electrical lines that lead to your light bulb, and you don’t feel it, but you do enjoy the results. Our society has made energy invisible. This invisibility makes energy convenient to use, but it also makes it easy to take it for granted. This website tries to make our appetite for energy visible.
Climate change is a phenomenon we now recognize as one of the most important challenges to ever confront humanity. Like energy use, it is also invisible to us, but in more than one way. The enormous volume of carbon dioxide – the principal gas implicated [...]

I pencil

This essay ” I, Pencil My Family Tree as told to Leonard E. Read” describes beautifully the challenge of understanding the supply chain carbon problem. Where do you draw the boundaries? How far down the line does the accounting have to go?

“I am a lead pencil—the ordinary wooden pencil familiar to all boys and girls and adults who can read and write.*

Writing is both my vocation and my avocation; that’s all I do.

You may wonder why I should write a genealogy. Well, to begin with, my story is interesting. And, next, I am a mystery—more so than a tree or a sunset or even a flash of lightning. But, sadly, I am taken for granted by those who use me, as if I were a mere incident and without background. This supercilious attitude relegates me to the level of the commonplace. This is a species of the grievous [...]

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